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Craig Zablo Posts

“Reservoir Dogs” – Tarantino and Cast Reveal Little-Known Facts

Posted in Celebs, Crime, Movies, and Trivia

Jackie Strauss and The Hollywood Reporter present Reservoir Dogs at 25: Quentin Tarantino and Cast Reveal Little-Known Facts.  Here are three of my favorites…

Making Reservoir Dogs was the happiest time of Tarantino’s life.
Tarantino, who had told THR he plans to retire after his next two films, recalled a personal story about the night Keitel had the cast over for dinner after they had finished two weeks of rehearsals and were about to embark on five weeks of filming. “I was living in Glendale, California, with my mom at the time and [drove to Harvey Weinstein’s house in] Malibu, it’s a long drive but it’s a cool drive,” he explained. “I’m sitting there at Harvey’s and I realized almost all the pressure was off my shoulders, cinematically. These guys were so perfect in their parts. They were so vibe-ing with each other and I thought, ‘My God, if I just keep the movie in focus, I’ve got a movie.'” He continued, “I remember that night getting in my car and just taking that drive all the way from Malibu to Glendale on Sunset Boulevard and that was the happiest time of my life. It was this thing I had thought about for so long, making movies in general, and I thought, ‘This might just work out.'”

All of the stars wanted different roles except for Roth.
When Roth received the script, he was instructed to read the parts of Mr. Blonde and Mr. Pink. But he quickly knew he wanted Mr. Orange. “This thing arrives, this ******* script, Reservoir Dogs — which I thought was a spelling mistake,” he recalls. “About 20 pages in I thought, ‘I’ve got to do this.’ I plowed on through and then the liar emerged, the ‘bad guy’ — the good guy.” (Madsen couldn’t help but interrupt to correct him: “The rat,” he scowled to laughs.) Keitel says he initially wanted the role of Mr. Blonde, but realized he couldn’t play it right. “Michael and Chris Penn did one of my favorite scenes in the movie together,” he recalled. As for Madsen, he wanted the role of Mr. Pink and even auditioned for it. “I did all the big scenes and Quentin just stood there watching me,” he said. “At the end I was all done and thought I did a really great job and Quentin looks at me and says, ‘You’re not Mr. Pink. You’re Mr. Blonde or you’re not in the movie.'”

Madsen says Mr. Blonde typecast him as the bad guy.
“I’ve done over 100 pictures and usually the only one that anyone wants to talk about is Reservoir Dogs and/or Kill Bill,” Madsen told THR. While he’s grateful to be a part of cinematic history, he says he thought his roles in Thelma & Louise and Free Willy would have helped to elevate him to leading-man status. “Unfortunately, it typecasted me as a bad guy,” he said. “I would prefer to be a leading man. I’m a leading man in a bad guy’s body, basically. And everybody thinks of me as the guy with the gun.” Still, he said he’s a long way from finished. “Dogs gave me a career. I wouldn’t imagine I would have been able to do that when I started as an actor, and there’s a lot coming that I’m waiting for.”

7 Things You Don’t Know About “Reservoir Dogs”

Posted in Celebs, Crime, Movies, and Trivia

Gordon Cox and Variety present 7 Things You Don’t Know About Reservoir Dogs.  Here are three of my favorites…

1. Tom Waits auditioned.
Tarantino let this tidbit slip as he discussed the casting process. “We had the casting director from ‘L.A. Law,’” the director recalled. “A lot of really wild people came in and read the parts. Tom Waits came in and read. I had Tom Waits read the Madonna speech, just so I could hear Tom Waits say those lines. And actually, other than Harvey, he gave me one of the first profound compliments on the script. No one had ever told me my work was poetic before.” (Roth, Madsen and Chris Penn all got their parts through those L.A. auditions; Buscemi came aboard after a round of casting in New York.)

2. Tarantino wanted to stage “Reservoir Dogs” as a play.
Keitel brought up this factoid as he recalled the film’s unusually long rehearsal process. “We had two weeks of rehearsal, which is unheard of in Hollywood,” he said. “We actually almost went to four, because Quentin thought at one time about doing a play.”

4. Madsen eventually got his inspiration from James Cagney.
The actor didn’t even practice his big moment at home. When it finally came time for him to shoot the big torture scene, he found inspiration in an unlikely source. “I heard the music, and I said, ‘Oh, ****, I better do something,’ and I started thinking about Jimmy Cagney,” Madsen said. “I remembered this weird little thing that Jimmy Cagney did in a movie that I saw. I don’t remember the name of it. He did this crazy little dance thing. It just popped into my head in the last second. That’s where it came from.” They only shot the scene three or four times, and the first shot of him breaking into that dance is the from the very first take.

Ken Meyer Jr.’s Ink Stains 73: Blyberg, McGregor & More!

Posted in Art, and Comics

If you’re a fan of fanzines, then you’ve got to check out Ken Meyer, Jr.’s monthly column Ink Stains.  Each month Ken (who is an amazing artist) posts… well, let’s let Ken explain…

I have a collection of over 200 fanzines from the 60’s-80’s that I plan to scan and talk about, one at a time. I hope to have some of the participants answer a few questions. Many of those participants are established comics professionals now, while some have gone on to other things. I will show a few snippets from each zine and give you a link to download a pdf of the whole thing, which I hope all of you will do!

For Ink Stains 73, Ken took a look at Woweekazowie #2 from 1976 from Publisher: Willie Blyberg and Editor: Dean Mullaney

Woweekazowie #2 features:

  • Killraven cover by Pete Iro
  • Black Panther back cover by Willie Blyberg
  • Iron Fist & Daughters of the Dragon splash by William Nevile & Sam de la Rosa
  • Don McGregor Interview and Checklist
  • Full page illo by Mark Gruenwald
  • Spot illos by Pete Iro, Willie Blyberg and others
  • Article by Mary Jo Duffy
  • Victory strip by Willie Blyberg
  • Full page Superman illo by Willie Blyberg (always loved this one!)
  • Articles, a letters page and more.

 

Woweekazowie was one of my all-time favorite fanzines.  Willie Blyberg was such a cool cat (where is Willie now?) and excellent artist.  Love the memories Woweekazowie #2 brings back.

Thanks to Ken Meyer, Jr. for making these available!

Top 10 Movie Soundtracks of All Time

Posted in Movies, and Music

Alex Maidy and JoBlo.com posted their choices for the Top 10 Movie Soundtracks of All Time.  Using just their list here are my top three and my suggestions for soundtracks that should have made the cut….

#8 – SUPERFLY

#6 – GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY

#1 – PULP FICTION

How could these soundtracks not have made the cut…

Saturday Night Fever: Biggest selling soundtrack ever.

Nighthawks: So under-rated as a film and soundtrack.

Sharkey’s Machine: see above

From Dusk Til Dawn: Tarantino knows how to make a soundtrack.

Jackie Brown: See above.

Escape from New York: John Carpenter soundtrack!

Sin City: Robert Rodriguez soundtrack

Rocky: Bill Conti classic.

What did I miss?

Your Favorite Movie Gunfights

Posted in Movies, and Trivia

Jacob Hall and /Film recently posted the results of Your Favorite Movie Gunfights.  Here are the top choices and my comments….

– The Matrix: really set a new standard for integrating computer effects into gunfights so much so that everyone knows what “bullet time” means.

–  Raiders of the Lost Ark: Not so much a gunfight as a “Don’t bring a sword to a gunfight.”

– Shoot ‘Em Up: A movie gunfight lover’s dream.

– Terminator 2: Judgment Day: Not so much a gunfight as the joy of watching Arnold use a helicopter’s mini-gun to shoot up everything without ever harming a human.

– Tombstone:  So many excellent gunfights to choose from and they nailed the right one.  “Did you ever see anything like that?”  “I’ve never even HEARD of anything like that.”

– The Way of the Gun: What a great under-rated movie.  The ending is crazy good.  Makes me want to watch it again soon!

So many other movies that could have made the cut: John Wick 1 & 2; Heat; The Good, the Bad and the Ugly are the four that came to mind first.  Others?

“The Soft, Sweet Lips of Hell” by O’Neil, Adams & Steve Englehart

Posted in Art, Authors, Comics, and Horror

Diversions of the Groovy Kind has posted The Soft, Sweet Lips of Hell by (writer) Denny O’Neil and (artists) Neal Adams & Steve Englehart which appeared in Vampirella #10 (December 1970)!  Englehart went on to fame as a comic book writer.  I had no idea he began his career as an artist.

Thanks to Diversions for giving us another look!

30 Things We Learned from James Mangold’s “3:10 to Yuma” Commentary

Posted in Celebs, Movies, Trivia, and TV

Rob Hunter and Film School Rejects present 30 Things We Learned from James Mangold’s 3:10 to Yuma Commentary.  Here are three of my favorites…

17. His second feature, Cop Land, was viewed by him as “a western, but setting it in the context of the suburban tri-state area.” The original 3:10 to Yuma served as an inspiration of sorts, and he extended that film a nod “in the sense that Stallone’s character is actually named Freddy Heflin and I named him after Van Heflin, the actor who played Dan Evans in the original.”

24. The cave where they huddle against a nighttime assault of bullets is in Los Angeles and is actually the same one featured in the Batman TV series where the Batmobile exited. It had gotten “so cold” in New Mexico that they returned to Hollywood to film the scene.

“No one should be playing a villain. Everyone should be playing a fully-realized person… No person in the world including Hitler or Osama Bin Laden walks around believing they’re a bad guy.”

Michael Mann’s “Heat” Prequel Drops Next Year!

Posted in Authors, Books, Crime, and Movies

Michael Mann’s Heat will finally get the prequel we’ve been hearing about for years.  It will come out next year… as a novel.

That’s right, a novel.

Mann will co-write along with Reed Farrel Coleman (an award-winning author).  All of the main characters from Heat including Detective Vincent Hanna (Pacino), Neil McCauley (De Niro), Chris Shihirlis (Kilmer), and Nate (Voight) will appear in the prequel.  The novel will be released through Michael Mann Books from publisher Harper/Collins.

Source: /Film.

Ken Meyer Jr.’s Ink Stains 71: Steranko, Ditko & More!

Posted in Art, and Comics

If you’re a fan of fanzines, then you’ve got to check out Ken Meyer, Jr.’s monthly column Ink Stains.  Each month Ken (who is an amazing artist) posts… well, let’s let Ken explain…

I have a collection of over 200 fanzines from the 60’s-80’s that I plan to scan and talk about, one at a time. I hope to have some of the participants answer a few questions. Many of those participants are established comics professionals now, while some have gone on to other things. I will show a few snippets from each zine and give you a link to download a pdf of the whole thing, which I hope all of you will do!

For Ink Stains 71, Ken took a look at Comic Crusader 5 and 6 from 1969 from Editor and Publisher: Martin L. Greim.

Comic Crusader 5 and 6 feature –

  • Covers by Steranko
  • Lots of fan art and articles
  • Comic story by Martin Greim
  • Early art by Dennis Fugitake
  • Steve Ditko’s Mr. A comic story
  • …and more!

 

The Steranko pieces make these issues worthy for me even if as Ken points out, it appears that someone else (Greim?) inked the cover to #5.

Thanks to Ken Meyer, Jr. for making these available!

50 Years of Richard Stark’s Parker

Posted in Authors, Books, Comics, Crime, and Trivia

If you’re a fan of Richard Stark’s Parker you’re going to love the 50 Years of Parker site.  Here’s a taste…

Parker’s Rules

  1. Don’t ever show a gun to a man you don’t want to kill.
  2. Don’t talk to the law.
  3. Always split the money fair.
  4. Each man for himself.
  5. Don’t kill somebody unless you have to. It puts the law on you like nothing else.
  6. Never leave a guy alive who’d like to see you dead.
  7. Don’t let yourself be framed in a lit doorway.
  8. Don’t meet in a town where you’re going to make a hit.
  9. Don’t stay in the hotel where you’re going to make a hit.
  10. Don’t take a job on consignment.
  11. Don’t work with anyone you can’t trust or don’t respect.
  12. When there’s no place to hide, stay where you are.
  13. Any job that requires more than five guys to be pulled can’t be pulled.
  14. For a big enough score, any rule can be broken.