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Category: Trivia

10 Things You Never Knew About “Maverick”

Posted in Celebs, Trivia, and TV

Me-TV posted 10 Things You Never Knew About Maverick.  Here are three of my favorites…

GARNER PLAYED BRET MAVERICK IN THREE DIFFERENT ‘MAVERICK’ TV SERIES.
It is the rare actor who can claim two iconic television characters and a successful big-screen career. Garner became a household name thanks to the witty and fun Maverick. The gambling Bret Maverick proved to be so beloved that numerous reboots followed over the decades. In 1979, a TV movie led to Young Maverick, an incredibly short-lived sequel that hardly featured Garner. In 1981, Maverick was dealt another hand in the series Bret Maverick. NBC surprisingly canceled the solidly performing show after a season.

THERE WAS A MASSIVE CROSSOVER EPISODE WITH OTHER WESTERNS.
The madcap season four episode “Hadley’s Hunters” trots out numerous cameos from other Warner Bros. Westerns. You can spot John Russell and Peter Brown from Lawman, Clint Walker from Cheyenne, Will Hutchins from Sugarfoot and Ty Hardin from Bronco. In addition, Edd Byrnes from 77 Sunset Strip also pops up — combing the mane of a horse called “77 Cherokee Strip.”

“SHADY DEAL AT SUNNY ACRES” WAS GARNER’S FAVORITE EPISODE.
Perhaps some of this had to do with the fact that Garner got to spend the episode comfortably whittling in a rocking chair. It’s also a flat-out brilliant piece of television, which carries many similarities to the classic film The Sting. Like we said, the outings with both Bret and Bart Maverick working together are quite special.

 

“Aliens” – 20 Facts You May Not Know

Posted in Celebs, Horror, Movies, and Trivia

Neil Gaskin and Film ’89 present Fact File – No.1 – Aliens (1986).  Here are three of my favorites…

2. Sigourney Weaver salary for Aliens was 28 times more than that of the first film:  Weaver was paid $35,000 for the first film and $1 million for the sequel. (she went on to earn $4 million for Alien 3 and $11 million for Alien: Resurrection).

5. For a science fiction film, it did usually well at the Academy Awards:  Aliens was nominated for seven Academy Awards, including a Best Actress nomination for Sigourney Weaver. It unsurprisingly won for Sound Effects Editing and Visual Effects.

14. It was the last roll of the dice for one of its stars:  Lance Henriksen had privately pledged to quit acting if this part didn’t work out for him after years of journeyman roles. It proved to be one of his most successful films.

34 Things We Learned from Edgar Wright’s “Baby Driver” Commentary

Posted in Celebs, Crime, Movies, and Trivia

Rob Hunter and Film School Rejects present 34 Things We Learned from Edgar Wright’s Baby Driver Commentary.  Here are three of my favorites…

10. Baby’s guardian, Joe, was written as a deaf African American man in his 80s, and CJ Jones was the only performer they auditioned who is actually deaf. “I started auditioning other very good actors who were pretending to be deaf, it made me feel immediately uncomfortable.”

13. The Michael Myers / Mike Myers mask gag originally featured two Halloween masks and one Austin Powers, but while Mike Myers had had granted permission “the Halloween people hadn’t said no, but they definitely hadn’t said yes.” Wright had to write an alternative for the scene and call Myers back to extend the permissions (for three masks). Myers shared a story with him about the first time he went to the bank with a paycheck from Saturday Night Live. It was made out to Michael Myers, and the teller said “Michael Myers? Are you gonna stab me?

21. The idea of having Doc’s nephew accompany Baby while casing the Post Office came from one of Wright’s interviews with ex-cons.

 

 

33 Things We Learned from the “Conan the Barbarian” Commentary

Posted in Celebs, Movies, and Trivia

Kate Erbland and Film School Rejects present 33 Things We Learned from the Conan the Barbarian Commentary.  Here are three of my favorites…

The narration at the beginning of the film was intended to be for Schwarzenegger. Milius points out that certain executives at Universal – he doesn’t name any names – didn’t trust Schwarzenegger, and there were concerns about his accent. “I said, ‘Of course, he has an accent. That’s why he’s Arnold.’,” says the director.

Milius hired actors to play against Schwarzenegger specifically based on their size, as he didn’t want many of Conan’s enemies to be smaller than he was. The director felt it helped build Conan as this iconic hero if he continuously took on and bested men who were much larger. “To have an opponent for Arnold, the guy has to be huge,” says Milius. Even James Earl Jones and Max Von Sydow are taller than the 6’2″ Schwarzenegger.

Executive producer Dino De Laurentiis wanted Milius to take out the scene with Conan, Valeria, and Subotai getting drunk in an inn, because he didn’t think it was dignified enough for the characters, particularly Conan. “The idea is that it’s great. They aren’t dignified. They have money, and they’re totally drunk and excited with power,” explains Milius. De Laurentiis especially didn’t like the shot where Conan passes out in his soup. “It’s like an Alka-Seltzer commercial,” says Schwarzenegger.

 

58 Things We Learned from James Gunn’s “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2” Commentary

Posted in Celebs, Humor, Movies, and Trivia

Rob Hunter and Film School Rejects present 58 Things We Learned from James Gunn’s Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Commentary.  Here are three of my favorites…

24. Glen Campbell’s “Southern Nights” was one of his favorite songs as a child, and he recalls the joy of attending a 4th of July party a couple years ago “at Jane Seymour’s house of all places” where he got to meet Campbell and listen to some live music from the man.

42. Stan Lee with the Watchers “doesn’t mean Stan Lee is a Watcher,”, but “who knows what Stan Lee is.”

55. Stallone asked how his line at Yondu’s viking funeral should be delivered, and Gunn replied “‘Have you seen the movie Babe?’ and he said ‘Yeah!’ I’m like this is you saying ‘That’ll do pig.’” My favorite part of this anecdote is the image of Stallone watching Babe.

 

23 Things We Learned from Ridley Scott’s ‘Alien Covenant’ Commentary

Posted in Horror, Movies, and Trivia

Rob Hunter and Film School Rejects present 23 Things We Learned from Ridley Scott’s Alien Covenant Commentary.  Here are three of my favorites…

9.   At 24:26 he acknowledges this is the “same plot as the original Alien, there’s a transmission, they go and find out.”

11.   Astronauts and NASA scientists have told him that they sometimes get ideas from science fiction films because filmmakers have thought their way around problems in ways that they themselves don’t.

14. More than once Scott says he’s going to hold back from saying something so as not to spoil it for listeners — as if people are listening to the commentary for their first watch of the film.

 

15 THINGS YOU NEVER KNEW ABOUT ‘HAWAII FIVE-O’

Posted in Celebs, Crime, Trivia, and TV

Me-TV presents 15 THINGS YOU NEVER KNEW ABOUT ‘HAWAII FIVE-O’.  Here are three of my favorites…

THE “FIVE-O” SLANG FOR POLICE CAME FROM THIS TELEVISION SHOW.
Ever wonder where that piece of slang came from? Believe it or not, the TV series originated it. The series’ title actually was an homage to Hawaii being the 50th state of the U.S.A. Hawaii Five-O used the numerals as the fictional police division on the show. Over the year, the term came to be used as code for police in general.

THE SHOW NEARLY STARRED GREGORY PECK.
Jack Lord will forever be associated with his character Steve McGarrett, but producers originally had other actors in mind. Richard Boone, the former star of Have Gun – Will Travel, was first offered the part. The former “Paladin” turned it down. Hollywood legend Gregory Peck was also considered for McGarrett. Robert Brown, perhaps best known for playing Lazarus in the Star Trek episode “The Alternative Factor,” nearly won the role, as well, before creators settled on Lord.

ONE CONTROVERSIAL EPISODE WAS BANNED AND WILL NOT BE SEEN AGAIN.
When it originally aired on January 7, 1970, “Bored, She Hung Herself” was one of the stranger cases of Hawaii Five-O. Don Quine, best known as a regular on The Virginian, portrayed Don Miles. He was the primary suspect in the episode, after his girlfriend, Wanda (Pamela Murphy), was found dead, hanging from a noose in their Hawaiian apartment. Audiences were unaccustomed to seeing a character who practices a so-called form of “yoga” with a noose. Somewhere in America, a viewer tried the hanging technique performed by Don at the opening of the episode — and died. “Bored, She Hung Herself” was never shown again, and is no longer included in syndication packages.

12 Tiny Little Goofs You Never Spotted in “I Love Lucy”

Posted in Humor, Trivia, and TV

Me-TV presents 12 Tiny Little Goofs You Never Spotted in I Love Lucy.  Here are three of my favorites…

FRED’S HEAD   “Redecorating”
Near the end, Lucy and Ricky enter the room, which has been wildly covered in wallpaper. Take a look behind the two when they walk in the door. William Frawley (Fred) can be spotted in the background, peeking around a wall, awaiting his cue. He quickly realizes he is in the the shot and steps back to hide.

CABLE CAR  “Lucy Learns to Drive”
Ever wonder how they drove those big ol’ automobiles on a closed set? Well, they didn’t. The cars were pulled around with cables. In this episode, Ethel waits for Ricky to pull up. When his car arrives, a thin black cable can be seen tugging the the vehicle into the shot. The black wire shakes wildly as it hauls in that heavy car.

RECYCLING THE PAPER   “Ricky’s Old Girlfriend” and “Lucy’s Club Dance”
The same New York Gazette newspaper appears repeatedly on the show. Either that, or “BOND ISSUE DEFEATED” was a common headline back in the 1950s.

The Walking Dead: 15 Awesome Things You Didn’t Know About Daryl

Posted in Celebs, Comics, Horror, Trivia, TV, and Zombies

Caitlin Leale and ScreenRant present The Walking Dead: 15 Awesome Things You Didn’t Know About Daryl. Here are three of my favorites…

15. HE’S STRICTLY FOR TV
Don’t expect Daryl Dixon to pop up in the comics anytime soon – or ever, according to The Walking Dead creator Robert Kirkman. He got fans’ hopes up on April Fool’s Day back in 2014 when he posted a joke comic book cover with Daryl on the front. However, Kirkman was quick to clarify that the cover was a joke, saying in an interview with MTV that he’ll never bring Daryl to the comics. The creator cited Daryl’s “immense popularity” as the main reasons that he’ll never write a crossover, explaining that despite the fact the television show is based on the comics, the two are on different paths and have core differences as a result. Unfortunately, Daryl just happens to be one of those differences.

10. YOU MIGHT BE READING INTO HIS TATTOOS TOO MUCH
Crossbow, motorcycle, tattoos – Daryl has all the “tough guy” bases covered. Daryl’s tattoos have been revealed on the show before, most notably in Season 3’s “Home.” Merle rips off Daryl’s shirt in the midst of a quarrel during the episode and reveals a host of scars over Daryl’s back. The point of the shot was to emphasize Daryl’s traumatic upbringing, but fans latched on to something else: what could Daryl’s devil-like back tattoos mean? According to Norman Reedus, not much. The actor has said that he opted out of covering his tattoos or giving Daryl his own unique designs and simply kept all of his personal tattoos for his Walking Dead character. Reedus also has several other tattoos besides the two revealed on his back: he also has his dad’s name (also Norman) on his chest, his son’s name “Mingus” on his right forearm, and several others.

3. DARYL WAS ORIGINALLY WRITTEN AS A RACIST DRUG ADDICT
It turns out Norman Reedus was an excellent choice to play Daryl Dixon, and not only because his talent shines through onscreen. Daryl was originally written as a harsher, more antagonistic character, akin to his brother Merle. Basically, he was just supposed to be another racist drug addict. Kirkman says you can see these characteristics come out the most in Season 1. However, Reedus wasn’t so convinced that this was the right choice for his character. As the show went on, the actor transformed his character from one exactly like his brother to one more resentful of his past and upbringing. Kirkman has said that it’s Daryl’s complexity that fans enjoy so much today is all due to Reedus’ creative choices, so if you’re a big fan of Daryl’s character, you have the actor to thank.

25 Things We Learned from the “Kong: Skull Island” Commentary

Posted in Horror, Movies, and Trivia

Rob Hunter and Film School Rejects present 25 Things We Learned from the Kong: Skull Island Commentary.  Here are three of my favorites…

5. The image that Bill Randa (John Goodman) hands Senator Willis (Richard Jenkins) was originally of Godzilla, but he fought against that as he felt the film needed to be about Kong from the beginning.

25. The post-credits scene almost didn’t make the cut as several voices felt it didn’t fit, but he argued successfully for its inclusion knowing that audiences would love the tease into the bigger monsterverse to come.

14. The helicopter occupant falling into Kong’s mouth is an homage to the 1933 film version where Kong actually ate people.

 

10 Major Plot Holes that Classic TV Writers Didn’t Bother to Fix

Posted in Trivia, and TV

Me-TV posts 10 Major Plot Holes that Classic TV Writers Didn’t Bother to Fix.   Here are three of my favorites…

‘MAMA’ ACTUALLY DIES BEFORE SHE GETS HER OWN SHOW
In a recent interview with Las Vegas Magazine, actress Vicki Lawrence had a little laugh recalling that her famous 1983 spin-off Mama’s Family started after Mama’s funeral already happened on TV in 1982. In the made-for-TV movie Eunice, Thelma Harper is said to have died in 1978, but TV audiences didn’t seem to notice or care when she came back to life on NBC in the early 1980s. They likely took a page from Mama’s book and sighed, “Oh, I’d rather not talk about it.”

CAN’T ANYONE REMEMBER BARNEY FIFE’S MIDDLE NAME?
For the majority of The Andy Griffith Show’s run, Don Knotts’ character introduces himself as “Barney P. Fife.” However, this changes at least twice. In “A Plaque for Mayberry,” his middle name is Oliver, and in “Class Reunion,” it changes to Milton. That explains why Wikipedia makes his name look like such a mouthful: Bernard “Barney” P. Milton Oliver Fife.

THEY ALSO COULDN’T DECIDE HOW LONG BARNEY’S BEEN DEPUTY SHERIFF.
Between seasons 4 and 5 of The Andy Griffith Show, writers seemed to get hazy on how long Barney Fife had been Deputy Sheriff. In the episode “Citizen’s Arrest,” Andy recalls welcoming Barney to the force 10 years ago, but by season 5’s “Barney’s Physical,” writers must have assumed Barney had been Deputy Sheriff as long as the show had been on air. In that episode, Barney celebrates his 5-year anniversary as Deputy Sheriff, getting a commemorative watch with the sketchy number of years etched inside.

14 TOP SECRET THINGS YOU NEVER KNEW ABOUT ‘MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE’! 

Posted in Celebs, Trivia, and TV

Me-TV posts 14 TOP SECRET THINGS YOU NEVER KNEW ABOUT ‘MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE’!  (I used to watch this show with my grandfather and I had forgotten that Peter Graves didn’t star in the first season.) Here are three of my favorites…

THE FAKE FOREIGN LANGUAGE SEEN ON THE SHOW WAS REFERRED TO AS “GELLERESE.”
Vaguely German, vaguely Romanian, a phony foreign language can be seen on signs in the show. The letters are peppered with accents, S’s are liberally replaced Z’s. So as not to offend any actual nationalities, the language was entirely made up, and the crew referred to the fictional tongue as “Gellerese” in tribute to the show’s creator.

IN EARLY EPISODES, THE TAPE WOULD LITERALLY SELF-DESTRUCT.
Initially, the special effects crew applied a chemical to the tape to make it smoke and decompose. This was not only costly and tricky, it wasn’t quite as dramatic as they had hoped. Eventually, the crew resorted to piping smoke through the reel-to-reel player through a hidden hose. Yes, they were just blowing smoke, so to speak.

THE SHOW SHARED A STUDIO AND SEVERAL ACTORS WITH ‘STAR TREK.’
Both Mission: Impossible and Star Trek were the work of Desilu Productions, the production house run by Lucille Ball. As both shows were of the same family, cast members could be seen in both productions. After Landau left the series following the third season, Leonard Nimoy filled his shoes (well, masks and wigs) as “Paris.” It was ironic, as Landau had previously turned down the role of Spock! William Shatner and George Takei can also be seen on M:I, as well as dozens of Star Trek guest stars like Ricardo Montalban, Joan Collins, Michael Ansara, Willian Schallert, Gary Lockwood, Lee Meriwether and more.

 

21 Things We Learned from “The Fate of the Furious” Commentary

Posted in Celebs, Movies, and Trivia

Rob Hunter and Film School Rejects present 21 Things We Learned from The Fate of the Furious Commentary. Here are three of my favorites…

11. He has tons of footage that didn’t make the film simply of Johnson and Statham trying to one-up each other with insults. “I think something’s gonna come out of it,” he says, “we’ll see, but I definitely wouldn’t mind seeing a two-hander between Shaw and Hobbs.”

18. Letty’s (Michelle Rodriguez) fight scene at the Russian shipyard reminds Gray of the Patricia Arquette / James Gandolfini brawl in True Romance.

5. The script originally had Dom giving Raldo’s (Celestino Cornielle) keys to his cousin as the race dictated, but Gray suggested otherwise on the day of filming. “That’s what the old Dom would have done,” he says, “but I wanted to give the audience a more evolved Dom.”