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Category: Crime

Preview of John Wick #1!

Posted in Art, Comics, Crime, and Movies

John Wick #1 from Dynamite Comics is available now…

JOHN WICK: BOOK OF RULES PART ONE

When a young John Wick emerges from prison and embarks upon his first, epic vendetta, he comes up against a strange, powerful community of assassins and must learn how to master the Book of Rules that guides their lethal business. What are the Three Bills? Who is Calamity? And who was John Wick before he became the Baba Yaga? Here for the first time, read the thrilling origin story of John Wick, from “Planet Hulk” writer Greg Pak and “Dark Horse Presents” artist Giovanni Valletta.

If you’d like to see a 5 page preview plus all of the variant covers you can by clicking over to The Outhousers.com.

The Best Movies That Should Be Made Into TV Shows

Posted in Books, Comics, Crime, Movies, and TV

IndieWire recently asked critics to pick the Best Movies That Should Be Made Into TV Shows.  Of all the movies suggested, I liked the idea of Walter Mosley’s Easy Rawlins Devil in a Blue Dress being turned into a series.  If it did well then other Easy Rawlins’ yarns would be ripe for the picking.

If I was to suggested movies that would make great tv shows, I’d suggest these three for starters…

  • The Expendables (where team members were actually expendable)
  • Sin City (using Miller’s stories)
  • Night of the Living Dead (focus on different stories/casts each season from the first few nights of the zombie outbreak)

21 Things We Learned from “The Taking of Pelham One Two Three” Commentary

Posted in Celebs, Crime, Movies, and Trivia

Rob Hunter and Film School Rejects present 21 Things We Learned from The Taking of Pelham One Two Three Commentary.  Here are three of my favorites…

7. The novel doesn’t spend much time at all with the transit cop character played here by Walter Matthau as Lt. Garber, and the book actually has a separate character named Garber as well. The actor loved the script, written by Peter Stone — who had written two previous films co-starring Matthau — and once he expressed interest they began beefing up the role.

19. Sargent recalled it being a “golden safety rule” during filming that no one get close to the electrified third rail despite the mostly confident belief that it was powered off by the transit authorities. There was apparently always a risk that someone might turn it back on again by accident or because they were unaware that it was off for a reason.

20. They rightly point out that today’s action films would rarely allow the villain to take his own life. “He would have to be shot eighteen times by Walter Matthau, and then fall and then a train would run him over, and that would propel him into the street where he’d get hit by a bus.”

 

Comic Legends: Was Punisher Initially Going to Die in His First Series?

Posted in Art, Comics, and Crime

My buddies, John Beatty and Mike Zeck are at the center of CBR.com’s Comic Legends: Was Punisher Initially Going to Die in His First Series?

That was an exciting time for comics.  The Punisher, up to that point, had been a secondary, guest-starring character who had real potential.  Steven Grant had the right take on Frank Castle and of course, Mike Zeck and John Beatty were the team to bring the project to life.

Sadly, Grant, Zeck and Beatty didn’t get to complete the series. Although as the piece says, “John Beatty’s finishes made it all look as consistent as possible.”  Thankfully, Grant, Zeck and Beatty did re-team on the Punisher graphic novel Return to Big Nothing.

21 Things We Learned from Rob Reiner’s “Misery” Commentary

Posted in Celebs, Crime, Horror, Movies, and Trivia

Rob Hunter and Film School Rejects present 21 Things We Learned from Rob Reiner’s Misery Commentary.  Here are three of my favorites…

2.  James Caan was not his first choice for the film, and he instead was turned down by Robert Redford, Warren Beatty, William Hurt (twice), Richard Dreyfuss, and others. “But at the end of the day you can’t imagine anybody else playing the part.”

13.  Bates was stage-trained and preferred excessive rehearsals while Caan is more “instinctive and naturalistic,” so they had to balance the rehearsal time to make it less than she wanted and more than he wanted.

18.  The novel has Annie chop off Paul’s feet and cauterize the stumps, but they opted to simply hobble him instead by having her break his feet with a sledgehammer. Their thinking was that they wanted him to be victorious in the end, and losing his feet would be too high of a price. “It was pretty darn painful to look at, so I don’t think we compromised it too much.”

 

 

“Bright” Starring Will Smith & Directed by David Ayer

Posted in Celebs, Crime, and Movies

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Bright stars Will Smith add is directed by David Ayer which is enough to get me to tune in.  I kind of dig the Alien Nation vibe Bright is giving off, so that’s a plus.  I just hope that the focus is on action, not comedy.  If so, Bright could be a winner.

20 Things We Learned from the “Atomic Blonde” Commentary.

Posted in Celebs, Crime, and Movies

Rob Hunter and Film School Rejects present 20 Things We Learned from the Atomic Blonde Commentary.  Here are three of my favorites…

3. The man seen running through the street in the opening is the film’s stunt coordinator, Sam Hargrave, “who’s also a good actor” and plays the soon to be dead James Gasciogne. He does various stunts throughout the film including the car flip.

15. The “one-take” stairwell fight scene features multiple hidden (or digital) edits including the motion blur of Lorraine throwing a guy to the floor at 1:12:04 and a handful of whip-pans that follow.

10. The book holding the cassette tapes at 32:53 is also in John Wick.

 

34 Things We Learned from Edgar Wright’s “Baby Driver” Commentary

Posted in Celebs, Crime, Movies, and Trivia

Rob Hunter and Film School Rejects present 34 Things We Learned from Edgar Wright’s Baby Driver Commentary.  Here are three of my favorites…

10. Baby’s guardian, Joe, was written as a deaf African American man in his 80s, and CJ Jones was the only performer they auditioned who is actually deaf. “I started auditioning other very good actors who were pretending to be deaf, it made me feel immediately uncomfortable.”

13. The Michael Myers / Mike Myers mask gag originally featured two Halloween masks and one Austin Powers, but while Mike Myers had had granted permission “the Halloween people hadn’t said no, but they definitely hadn’t said yes.” Wright had to write an alternative for the scene and call Myers back to extend the permissions (for three masks). Myers shared a story with him about the first time he went to the bank with a paycheck from Saturday Night Live. It was made out to Michael Myers, and the teller said “Michael Myers? Are you gonna stab me?

21. The idea of having Doc’s nephew accompany Baby while casing the Post Office came from one of Wright’s interviews with ex-cons.