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Category: TV

Stephen King Interview!

Posted in Authors, Books, Celebs, Horror, Movies, and TV

Jenelle Riley has a nice interview with Stephen King at Variety.  Here are a couple of tidbits…

Do you enjoy acting? A lot of people cite your performance in “Creepshow” as memorable.
What they really talk about is the bit I did in “Sons of Anarchy” where I played a crazy guy who cleans up bodies. That was fun. Look, I like to sing in the shower, too, but that doesn’t mean anybody’s ever going to put me on a record.

Is there anything that scares you? 
Oh God, yes. Air travel is a big one with me because I feel like I’m not in control. I’m close to 70 now, so I’m worried about basically having the cheese slide off my cracker — Alzheimer’s, dementia, stuff like that. I don’t like bugs, I don’t like bats, I don’t like things that creep and crawl. With the exception of snakes, somehow they don’t really turn my dials. But I’m also afraid of people like Brady Hartsfield, they’re out there. And it crosses my mind every time I do a public event. You think about somebody like Mark David Chapman, and you think maybe somebody’s got a knife out for you. But that’s part of life.

Hard to believe Stephen King has been knocking out best-sellers for over 40 years!

The Walking Dead: 15 Awesome Things You Didn’t Know About Daryl

Posted in Celebs, Comics, Horror, Trivia, TV, and Zombies

Caitlin Leale and ScreenRant present The Walking Dead: 15 Awesome Things You Didn’t Know About Daryl. Here are three of my favorites…

15. HE’S STRICTLY FOR TV
Don’t expect Daryl Dixon to pop up in the comics anytime soon – or ever, according to The Walking Dead creator Robert Kirkman. He got fans’ hopes up on April Fool’s Day back in 2014 when he posted a joke comic book cover with Daryl on the front. However, Kirkman was quick to clarify that the cover was a joke, saying in an interview with MTV that he’ll never bring Daryl to the comics. The creator cited Daryl’s “immense popularity” as the main reasons that he’ll never write a crossover, explaining that despite the fact the television show is based on the comics, the two are on different paths and have core differences as a result. Unfortunately, Daryl just happens to be one of those differences.

10. YOU MIGHT BE READING INTO HIS TATTOOS TOO MUCH
Crossbow, motorcycle, tattoos – Daryl has all the “tough guy” bases covered. Daryl’s tattoos have been revealed on the show before, most notably in Season 3’s “Home.” Merle rips off Daryl’s shirt in the midst of a quarrel during the episode and reveals a host of scars over Daryl’s back. The point of the shot was to emphasize Daryl’s traumatic upbringing, but fans latched on to something else: what could Daryl’s devil-like back tattoos mean? According to Norman Reedus, not much. The actor has said that he opted out of covering his tattoos or giving Daryl his own unique designs and simply kept all of his personal tattoos for his Walking Dead character. Reedus also has several other tattoos besides the two revealed on his back: he also has his dad’s name (also Norman) on his chest, his son’s name “Mingus” on his right forearm, and several others.

3. DARYL WAS ORIGINALLY WRITTEN AS A RACIST DRUG ADDICT
It turns out Norman Reedus was an excellent choice to play Daryl Dixon, and not only because his talent shines through onscreen. Daryl was originally written as a harsher, more antagonistic character, akin to his brother Merle. Basically, he was just supposed to be another racist drug addict. Kirkman says you can see these characteristics come out the most in Season 1. However, Reedus wasn’t so convinced that this was the right choice for his character. As the show went on, the actor transformed his character from one exactly like his brother to one more resentful of his past and upbringing. Kirkman has said that it’s Daryl’s complexity that fans enjoy so much today is all due to Reedus’ creative choices, so if you’re a big fan of Daryl’s character, you have the actor to thank.

Jonathan Maberry Interview!

Posted in Authors, Books, Celebs, Comics, Horror, Movies, TV, and Zombies

ComicBook101.com recently posted an interview with Jonathon Maberry that’s worth a read.

Jonathan Maberry is a NY Times bestselling author, executing a wide-ranging body of work for Marvel, Dark Horse, and more. He is currently doing loads of stuff with IDW, from the frenetically-paced, terrifyingly good ‘V-Wars’, to the angst-loaded, twist-laden ‘Rot & Ruin’. A fan would be breathless following the work of this writer, just as we were when he granted us the following interview, in which he promised lots of rot, ruin, and paranoia, among other things.

Check it out!

R.I.P. – Glen Campbell

Posted in Celebs, Movies, Music, RIP, and TV

Glen Campbell has passed on.  From his official website:

It is with the heaviest of hearts that we announce the passing of our beloved husband, father, grandfather, and legendary singer and guitarist, Glen Travis Campbell, at the age of 81, following his long and courageous battle with Alzheimer’s disease.

Glen is survived by his wife, Kim Campbell of Nashville, TN; their three children, Cal, Shannon and Ashley; his children from previous marriages, Debby, Kelli, Travis, Kane, and Dillon; ten grandchildren, great- and great-great-grandchildren; sisters Barbara, Sandra, and Jane; and brothers John Wallace “Shorty” and Gerald.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Glen Campbell Memorial Fund at BrightFocus Foundation through the CareLiving.org donation page.

I was and continue to be a Glen Campbell fan.  My thoughts and prayers go out to his family, friends and fans.

10 Major Plot Holes that Classic TV Writers Didn’t Bother to Fix

Posted in Trivia, and TV

Me-TV posts 10 Major Plot Holes that Classic TV Writers Didn’t Bother to Fix.   Here are three of my favorites…

‘MAMA’ ACTUALLY DIES BEFORE SHE GETS HER OWN SHOW
In a recent interview with Las Vegas Magazine, actress Vicki Lawrence had a little laugh recalling that her famous 1983 spin-off Mama’s Family started after Mama’s funeral already happened on TV in 1982. In the made-for-TV movie Eunice, Thelma Harper is said to have died in 1978, but TV audiences didn’t seem to notice or care when she came back to life on NBC in the early 1980s. They likely took a page from Mama’s book and sighed, “Oh, I’d rather not talk about it.”

CAN’T ANYONE REMEMBER BARNEY FIFE’S MIDDLE NAME?
For the majority of The Andy Griffith Show’s run, Don Knotts’ character introduces himself as “Barney P. Fife.” However, this changes at least twice. In “A Plaque for Mayberry,” his middle name is Oliver, and in “Class Reunion,” it changes to Milton. That explains why Wikipedia makes his name look like such a mouthful: Bernard “Barney” P. Milton Oliver Fife.

THEY ALSO COULDN’T DECIDE HOW LONG BARNEY’S BEEN DEPUTY SHERIFF.
Between seasons 4 and 5 of The Andy Griffith Show, writers seemed to get hazy on how long Barney Fife had been Deputy Sheriff. In the episode “Citizen’s Arrest,” Andy recalls welcoming Barney to the force 10 years ago, but by season 5’s “Barney’s Physical,” writers must have assumed Barney had been Deputy Sheriff as long as the show had been on air. In that episode, Barney celebrates his 5-year anniversary as Deputy Sheriff, getting a commemorative watch with the sketchy number of years etched inside.

14 TOP SECRET THINGS YOU NEVER KNEW ABOUT ‘MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE’! 

Posted in Celebs, Trivia, and TV

Me-TV posts 14 TOP SECRET THINGS YOU NEVER KNEW ABOUT ‘MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE’!  (I used to watch this show with my grandfather and I had forgotten that Peter Graves didn’t star in the first season.) Here are three of my favorites…

THE FAKE FOREIGN LANGUAGE SEEN ON THE SHOW WAS REFERRED TO AS “GELLERESE.”
Vaguely German, vaguely Romanian, a phony foreign language can be seen on signs in the show. The letters are peppered with accents, S’s are liberally replaced Z’s. So as not to offend any actual nationalities, the language was entirely made up, and the crew referred to the fictional tongue as “Gellerese” in tribute to the show’s creator.

IN EARLY EPISODES, THE TAPE WOULD LITERALLY SELF-DESTRUCT.
Initially, the special effects crew applied a chemical to the tape to make it smoke and decompose. This was not only costly and tricky, it wasn’t quite as dramatic as they had hoped. Eventually, the crew resorted to piping smoke through the reel-to-reel player through a hidden hose. Yes, they were just blowing smoke, so to speak.

THE SHOW SHARED A STUDIO AND SEVERAL ACTORS WITH ‘STAR TREK.’
Both Mission: Impossible and Star Trek were the work of Desilu Productions, the production house run by Lucille Ball. As both shows were of the same family, cast members could be seen in both productions. After Landau left the series following the third season, Leonard Nimoy filled his shoes (well, masks and wigs) as “Paris.” It was ironic, as Landau had previously turned down the role of Spock! William Shatner and George Takei can also be seen on M:I, as well as dozens of Star Trek guest stars like Ricardo Montalban, Joan Collins, Michael Ansara, Willian Schallert, Gary Lockwood, Lee Meriwether and more.

 

15 Great TV Shows Netflix Needs To Add To Their Library

Posted in TV

Zak Wojnar and ScreenRant present 15 Great TV Shows Netflix Needs To Add To Their Library.  using just their list, here are the three I’d request…

15. BATMAN: THE ANIMATED SERIES
Who is the best Batman? Some people say Christian Bale, others say Michael Keaton. There’s probably one misguided fool out there who says George Clooney. But a big percentage of fans out there agree, the powerful timbre of the inimitable Kevin Conroy is the greatest take on the Caped Crusader.

Batman: The Animated Series is widely regarded as one of the greatest animated programs of all time, and the definitive version of Gotham’s Dark Knight. The influence of the series cannot be overstated. When shows like Arrow and Gotham are at their best, they’re essentially live-action versions of the animated world created by Bruce Timm, Paul Dini, and co. all the way back in 1992.

It’s shocking, then, that this seminal superhero saga is currently unavailable on any subscription-based streaming service. Sure, episodes can be purchased for two bucks a pop on Amazon Video, but Warner Brothers is keeping way too tight of a leash on its most famous cartoon. For that matter, what about Superman: The Animated Series and Batman Beyond? DC is in the midst of preparing a new digital streaming service (which will air original programming, including the eagerly-anticipated third season of Young Justice), but there’s no word yet as to whether any of these legendary shows might be added to the platform when it launches. Hint: they really should!

12. THE ADVENTURES OF SUPERMAN
Before Batman: The Animated Series in the ’90s, before The Incredible Hulk and Wonder Woman in the ’70s, and even before Adam West‘s Batman in the ’60s, there was The Adventures of Superman.

This half-hour 1950s series starred George Reeves as the Man of Steel, and it remains a favorite among old-school comics fans for its admirable fidelity to the printed stories of the era. In the first season, written during the Golden Age of Comics, Superman went up against pinstriped-suited mobsters and their film noir molls. George Reeves shined as Clark Kent, hard-edged intrepid reporter, and when he eventually suited up as Superman, he brought an admirable physicality to the low-budget production, filling out his costume with barrel-chested gravitas and leaping out of windows with whimsical bravado.

The Adventures of Superman is required viewing for any fan of superhero media, but it’s currently unavailable on any streaming service. This is a situation which needs to be remedied – immediately.

1. MIAMI VICE
Before Miami Vice, every television show looked like Dragnet. Flat camera angles, sparse sets, old men in brown suits, and little personality. Michael Mann saw the dry state of television drama and decided to do something about it. He created Miami Vice, a cop show like no other, with film-style production values, unprecedented use of licensed music, and sexy, chic, charismatic leads in the form of Don Johnson and Philip Michael Thomas.

Miami Vice changed the rules of television, featuring long stretches with little dialogue, letting licensed music, grand imagery, and emotional context to push the story forward. These days, pretty much every show relies on dramatic “music video sequences” to convey their stories, but Miami Vice did it first, and did it best.

The series was on Netflix for a time, but is no longer available there. The first four seasons are still on Hulu, though the fantastic fifth and final season is curiously missing from the service. Recently, the series was released on Blu ray disc, remastered in High Definition, but with the original 4:3 aspect ration intact (no needless cropping here!). This HD version of the so-called “MTV Cops” series needs to be brought over to Netflix, so the whole world can enjoy the entire Miami Vice story with the best visuals possible.

Shows that didn’t make their list that I’d add:

  • The Wild, Wild West
  • Cheyenne
  • The Shield
  • Deadwood
  • The Wire

George Romero Interview ‘Road of the Dead,’ & More!

Posted in Celebs, Horror, Movies, and TV


George (Night of the Living Dead) Romero was working to arrange financing for Road of the Dead, a proposed new installment in Romero’s zombie franchise before he passed on. Romero pitched Road of the Dead by saying…

“In the darkest days of the zombie apocalypse, the last safe place on earth is anything but, as a mad despot uses the spectacle of high-octane carnage to keep control of his populace… “It’s ‘Fast and the Furious’ with zombies at the wheel”…

While Road of the Dead doesn’t sound like the zombie film that I’d like to see, I’d give it a go and hope to be pleasantly surprised.  Romero is the man who redefined the genre.

You can check out Romero’s thoughts on Road of the Dead, modern zombie films and more by clicking over to  George Romero Talks ‘Road of the Dead,’ His Disdain for ‘World War Z’ and Why He Liked ‘La La Land’ More Than ‘Moonlight’.

Source: IndieWire.

16 Fascinating Facts About Peter Falk and “Columbo”

Posted in Celebs, Trivia, and TV

Me-TV presents 16 Fascinating Facts About Peter Falk and Columbo.  Here are three of my favorites (and it was tough to just choose three):

HE WAS THE FIRST ACTOR NOMINATED FOR AN OSCAR AND EMMY THE SAME YEAR.
In 1961, Falk earned the distinction of becoming the first actor to be nominated for an Oscar and an Emmy in the same year. He received nominations for his supporting roles in Murder, Inc. and television program The Law and Mr. Jones. Incredibly, Falk repeated this double nomination in 1962, being nominated again for a supporting actor role in Pocketful of Miracles and best actor in “The Price of Tomatoes,” an episode of The Dick Powell Theatre, for which he took home the award.

HE WASN’T THE FIRST ACTOR TO PLAY COLUMBO.
Though the character Columbo first appeared on television in 1960, it would be nearly a decade before Falk would become synonymous with the rumpled detective. First, Bert Freed played the LAPD flatfoot in a 1960 episode of anthology series The Chevy Mystery Show. A couple years later, Thomas Mitchell (pictured to the left) played the sleuth onstage in a production called Prescription: Murder in San Francisco. When it was decided that the play would be turned into a television movie in 1968, the lead was offered to Lee J. Cobb and Bing Crosby, but Falk landed the part.

HE SUPPLIED COLUMBO’S WARDROBE AND OFTEN AD LIBBED.
Perhaps to add further authenticity to the LAPD detective, Falk personally supplied his character’s shabby clothes. One anecdote purports that when asked whether Columbo’s trademark raincoat was in the Smithsonian, the actor retorted that the garment was in his upstairs closet. Falk also ad libbed extensively as the character, throwing adversaries (and fellow actors) off balance with improvised misdirection.

10 LITTLE MISTAKES YOU NEVER NOTICED IN ‘THE BRADY BUNCH’

Posted in Trivia, and TV

MeTV  presents 10 LITTLE MISTAKES YOU NEVER NOTICED IN THE BRADY BUNCH! Here are three of my favorites…

What’s in a Name?  “What Goes Up…”
It can be tough to keep actors’ and characters’ names straight in the heat of the moment. In “What Goes Up…,” when Peter hops up on the trampoline, Florence Henderson cheers, “Go get ’em, Chris!” A bit later, Greg lets an “Eve” slip intead of “Jan.” This also happens in “Amateur Night,” when the kids practice for a talent show, as Marcia says, “C’mon, Chris!”

HOME SECURITY IS A REAL PANE IN THE GLASS.   “The Big Bet”
This is a little goof you can spot in a few episodes, but this example comes from “The Big Bet.” When Bobby comes in through the sliding glass door, the curtain breezes through the frame — there is no glass in the sliding glass door! In another episode, Sam the Butcher puts his hand through the non-existant pane.

WAS SPIDER-MAN TO BLAME?   “The Hero”
Peter rescues a little girl from a collapsing shelving unit at the toy store. When the case falls over, you can clearly see a thin, white rope yanking the red shelves from the wall.

Which “Twilight Zone” is Your Personal Nightmare?

Posted in Horror, and TV

MeTV  presents Which Twilight Zone is Your Personal Nightmare?

As you can see I came out with Eye of the Beholder.  EotB is an excellent episode but if I was to pick my own personal nightmare it would have been…

Nightmare at 20,000 Feet – Not much could be worse than seing a creature on the wing of the plane you’re flying on…DURING A STORM… AT NIGHT… TEARING UP THE ENGINES… AND NO ONE ELSE SEES IT!

Ok.  Maybe there is something worse…

To Serve Man – Trapped on a spaceship piloted by giants who are taking you to their planet to EAT YOU!

11 THINGS YOU MIGHT NOT REALIZE ANDY GRIFFITH DID BEYOND ‘THE ANDY GRIFFITH SHOW’!

Posted in Celebs, Humor, Movies, Trivia, and TV

MeTV  presents 11 THINGS YOU MIGHT NOT REALIZE ANDY GRIFFITH DID BEYOND ‘THE ANDY GRIFFITH SHOW’!  Here are three of my favorites…

HE TAUGHT HIGH SCHOOL.
After graduating from the University of North Carolina, Griffith hopped from Chapel Hill to Goldsboro, North Carolina, where he taught drama at Goldsboro High School for a few years. Go Mighty Cougars!

HE PLAYED SHERIFF ANDY TAYLOR ON FOUR DIFFERENT TV SERIES.
Okay, we are going to spend a little time talking about Andy Taylor. The Sheriff pulled off the rare feat of appearing on four different shows — The Danny Thomas Show, The Andy Griffith Show, Mayberry R.F.D. and Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

HE WAS NOMINATED FOR TWO TONY AWARDS FOR HIS WORK ON BROADWAY.
Griffith took to Broadway in 1955, starring in Ira Levin’s comedic drama No Time for Sergeants. Roddy McDowell, seen here hanging from his leg, played Griffith’s buddy. The Tony Awards honored Griffith with a nomination for Distinguished Supporting or Featured Dramatic Actor at the 1956 ceremony. He lost to Ed Begley. Four years later, he earned a nomination for Distinguished Musical Actor for his lead role in Destry Rides Again.

 

15 Mature Comic Book TV Shows We Need To See Next

Posted in Comics, and TV

Michael Edward Taylor and ScreenRant present 15 Mature Comic Book TV Shows We Need To See Next.  Using just their choices here are my top three plus a few that didn’t make their list…

11. HUMAN TARGET
Please try to wipe that lame 2010 Fox series of the same name from your memory, because it was the second worst adaptation of the DC/Vertigo title of the same name featuring detective/bodyguard Christopher Chance. (For what it’s worth, the top honor goes to a short-lived 1992 series starring Rick Springfield.)

The key to the character’s appeal is taking on the appearance and persona of the clients he’s sworn to protect in order to take down assassins and other nefarious entities who stalk them, and the effect his unusual profession has on his psyche. This is ripe for a mature television adaptation that delves into his complicated psychology and dangerous line of work. Sure, the character made an appearance on the 5th season of Arrow, but he deserves to be front and center with his own series with no content restrictions.

2. WATCHMEN
Ever since Terry Gilliam’s aborted 1980s adaptation, there has been a growing consensus that Alan Moore and Dave Gibbon’s groundbreaking classic Watchmen would work better as a television miniseries than a feature film.

And even with Zack Snyder’s 2009 movie still fresh in our minds, a big-budget premium cable adaptation should still happen. Why? Because Moore’s densely plotted 12-issue series simply can’t be completely covered in a movie, no matter the length.

It would take 12 episodes (or more) to fully explore every major plot reveal and characterization. Just a few years ago, Snyder was in contact with HBO to pitch a series, and while that idea seemed to dissolve, Damon Lindelof (The Leftovers, Lost) appears to be picking up where he left off. This may still happen yet. Will it be live-action or animated? Will it add new storyline elements (a risky proposition), or stick close to the source material (…giant psychic squid, another risky proposition)? We’ll have to see if it comes to fruition first.

1. 100 BULLETS
There have been rumors of a 100 Bullets movie or television series in the works for years, and to be honest, it’s kinda maddening that the Brian Azzarello Vertigo series created in 1999 still hasn’t made it onto the small screen. It’s probably the one adult comic series that would make the easiest transition to the medium.

The premise revolves around a shadowy organization that equips victims with the ability to take revenge. They’re told the guns they use have untraceable bullets, letting them get away with murder. But while that may be true, they eventually get coerced into a world of contract killing and political intrigue.

A crime drama full of murky anti-heroes, sex, violence, and unpredictable plot twists would be a perfect match in the modern television landscape where all great characters exist in shades of gray. It’s beyond time for 100 Bullets to blast through the television screen and into our hearts.

+++++

Here are other comics that would make great transitions to tv shows.