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Previews & Reviews that are Z's Views

A Few Facts About Lucille Ball

Eddie Deezen and Neatorama present A Few Facts You May Not Know About Lucille Ball.  Here are three of my favorites…

* Lucy was born a brunette. She later was a blond model. It wasn’t until she was pushing 30 that Lucy first dyed her hair the world-famous red color. She became a redhead to appear in the 1943 movie Du Barry Was a Lady.

* Lucy had no eyebrows. For her first movie role inRoman Scandals (1933) she shaved her eyebrows off. (She played a slave girl.) They never grew back.

* Lucy was terrified of birds. Because birds were her main phobia, Lucy refused to stay in any hotel room that had pictures of birds or had birds on the wallpaper. No birds or pictures of birds were ever allowed in her home.

25 Yada Yada Yada Facts About “Seinfeld”

Jennifer M. Wood and Mental_Floss present 25 Yada Yada Yada Facts About Seinfeld Here are three of my favorites…

2. IT WAS NEVER PITCHED AS “A SHOW ABOUT NOTHING.”
During a 2014 Reddit AMA, Jerry Seinfeld admitted that both he and co-creator Larry David were surprised by how Seinfeld earned its “show about nothing” moniker: “The pitch for the show, the real pitch, when Larry and I went to NBC in 1988, was we want to show how a comedian gets his material,’” Seinfeld explained. “The show about nothing was just a joke in an episode many years later, and Larry and I to this day are surprised that it caught on as a way that people describe the show, because to us it’s the opposite of that.”

5. STEVE BUSCEMI AUDITIONED FOR GEORGE.
Steve Buscemi is one of many soon-to-be-successful actors who unsuccessfully auditioned for Seinfeld. David Alan Grier was also in the mix, as was David Letterman’s bandleader Paul Shaffer, who said in his autobiography that his resemblance to Larry David (upon whom George is based) was what made him of interest to the show’s creators.

22. SEINFELD TURNED DOWN $110 MILLION FOR SEASON 10.
Not that there’s anything wrong with that. But when Seinfeld turned down the chance to earn $5 million per episode—a grand total of $110 million—to come back for a tenth season, the network finally got that he wasn’t kidding around.

16 Nostalgic Facts About “Stand by Me”

Roger Cormier and Mental_Floss present 16 Nostalgic Facts About Stand by Me.  Here are three of my favorites…

3. COCA-COLA ALMOST SHUT DOWN THE MOVIE ENTIRELY.
The soda company bought Embassy Pictures, the film’s original production company, and announced they weren’t going to fund Stand by Me just two days before they were set to start shooting. Television legend Norman Lear—who had worked with Reiner for years on All in the Family—was one of the three owners of Embassy prior to its sale. He believed in the project enough that he agreed to personally foot the film’s $8 million budget.

14. STEPHEN KING WAS IMPRESSED.
After Reiner screened the finished product for the author, King excused himself for 15 minutes. When he returned, he said it was the first time one of his stories was successfully put on film. King even applauded Reiner for changing it so that Gordie picks up the gun instead of Chris, wishing he had thought of that in the first place.

13. REINER CAME UP WITH THE TITLE.
Columbia Pictures didn’t like the idea of using The Body as the movie title for a variety of reasons. Reiner thought naming it after the Ben E. King song that plays at the end of the movie would be good. Co-writer Raynold Gideon said Reiner’s suggestion was the “least unpopular option.”

Tom Hardy Gets “100 Bullets”

As a huge fan, I loved reading this week that Tom Hardy has teamed with New Line Cinema to bring Brian Azzarello and Eduardo Risso’s 100 Bullets to a theater near you.  Hardy looks to direct and star in the adaption.

My guess is Hardy will play Lono which would work.  If he doesn’t and needs help with the cast, I’ll stick with my 100 Bullets dream cast from 2011.

Source: The Hollywood Reporter.

16 Biting Facts About “Fright Night”

Jennifer M. Wood and Mental_Floss present 16 Biting Facts About Fright Night.  Here are three of my favorites…

2. PETER VINCENT MADE THE STORY CLICK.
It wasn’t until Holland conceived of the character of Peter Vincent, the late-night horror movie host played by Roddy McDowall, that he really found the story. While discussing the idea with a department head at Columbia Pictures, Holland realized what The Boy Who Cried Vampire would do: “Of course, he’s gonna go to Vincent Price!” Which is when the screenplay clicked. “The minute I had Peter Vincent, I had the story,” Holland told Dread Central. “Charley Brewster was the engine, but Peter Vincent was the heart.”

5. RODDY MCDOWALL DID NOT WANT TO PLAY THE PART LIKE VINCENT PRICE.
Once he was cast, Roddy McDowall made the decision that Peter Vincent was nothing like Vincent Price—specifically: he was a terrible actor. “My part is that of an old ham actor,” McDowall told Monster Land magazine in 1985. “I mean a dreadful actor. He had a moderate success in an isolated film here and there, but all very bad product. Basically, he played one character for eight or 10 films, for which he probably got paid next to nothing. ..”

16. VINCENT PRICE LOVED THE MOVIE.
Holland had the chance to meet Vincent Price one night at a dinner party at McDowall’s. And the actor was well aware that McDowall’s character was based on him. “I was a little bit embarrassed by it,” admitted Holland. “He said it was wonderful and he thought Roddy did a wonderful job. Thank God he didn’t ask why he wasn’t cast in it.”

15 Fast Facts About “Days of Thunder”

Eric D. Snider and Mental_Floss present 15 Fast Facts About Days of Thunder.  Here are three of my favorites…

6. AS WITH SO MANY THINGS, WE CAN THANK PAUL NEWMAN FOR THE FILM’S EXISTENCE.
The legendary actor and part-time racer shared his enthusiasm for motorsports with Tom Cruise when they made The Color of Money together. The two were then introduced to NASCAR team owner Rick Hendrick (the inspiration for Randy Quaid’s character), who let budding racing enthusiast Cruise drive a stock car himself. Cruise’s reaction after taking a car around the track at 175 mph: “Hey, we gotta make a movie about this!”

12. AS YOU’D EXPECT, THE RACING SCENES WERE FILMED WITH THE CARS GOING MUCH SLOWER THAN THEY USUALLY WOULD: ONLY 120 MPH.
That’s down from the 200 miles per hour those cars would do in a real race. And still, even at a reduced speed, the work was dangerous. Tony Scott told The New York Times, “There’s a major crash in the middle of the movie at speeds of 120 to 140 miles an hour manned by stunt drivers. Things happen to metal at 140 miles an hour that don’t happen at 60 miles an hour.” Despite that, Scott boasted that the total on-set injuries for the entire production only added up to 13 stitches.

15. THE SCENE WHERE NASCAR BOSS BIG JOHN THREATENS TO FIRE TRICKLE AND BURNS IF THEY BUMP EACH OTHER ON THE TRACK AGAIN—THEN FORCES THEM TO DRIVE TO DINNER TOGETHER—WAS BASED ON A REAL INCIDENT WITH GEOFF BODINE AND DALE EARNHARDT.
Bodine and Earnhardt did not, however, destroy two rental cars in the process. But such shenanigans were attributed to 1950s racers Curtis Turner and Joe Weatherly, who were the Cole Trickles of their day.